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Exclusive! Amit Mishra: You need to be physically fit to perform live on stage

In an exclusive chat with OTTplay, he talked about his love for Bengali food and his responsibility as a live performer. Read on…

Exclusive! Amit Mishra: You need to be physically fit to perform live on stage
Amit Mishra
  • Shamayita Chakraborty

Last Updated: 06.44 PM, Jan 24, 2023

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Amit Mishra became a household name with Bulleya – the iconic song from Ae Dil Hai Mushkil. He has been offering hit numbers one after the other since then. His song Kyon from Netflix show Thai Massage has become very popular recently. The musician was in Kolkata for a concert on January 25. In an exclusive chat with OTTplay, he talked about his love for Bengali food and his responsibility as a live performer. Read on…

You are coming to Kolkata. What are you looking forward to?

It is the City of Joy and I am looking forward to a great concert. I am going to meet great musicians and that’s going to be great. And also food. Every time I come to Kolkata, my friends suggest me something special to explore. This time, I am going to try rosogollar payesh and baked rosogolla. I enjoy Bengali food. My friend Ash King also suggested a famous dhaba that I need to explore.

How do you define a hit song in a time when views can be purchased?

When I stand on my balcony in Mumbai, I can hear a lot of DJ nights, club music etc, because of the locality. If I can hear a song three days consecutively from my balcony I consider that song to be a hit. For example, there is a Bengali-Punjabi single, Arey Pagol Hoye Jabo Ami, which did not show great numbers. But I hear it fairly regularly and realised that it is a hit number. Also, if you sing a hit number, you will know from the vibes of your audience. I recently sang a song in Thai Massage. It is penned by Irshad Kamil and Joi Barua composed the song. I got an overwhelming response for it on social media. In a way, the digital response helped me understand the popularity.

Reality shows, a boon or bane for an artiste?

It is a very good platform for an artiste to get primary exposure. It boosts confidence among young artistes. I am studio trained. It took me around 15-20 years to get my first hit number. Hence, I would not be able to connect to this idea of ‘shot to fame’. However, I see how it helps young artistes. There is one thing though that I don’t understand. How do the parents manage the children’s mental health when they see low in life after getting used to fame and glory? Life is not linear and everybody will face highs and lows. Once the kids see so much of lights, fame, hype, camera, and selfies, how do they tackle the other side of it? Bachpan ka fame ko use karna easy nehi hai.

After KK’s unfortunate demise, the concern over health and safety at concert areas came into discussion. Do you experience any change?

KK’s unfortunate death was a wake-up call for all of us. Yes, the event management companies, organisers, and venue managers need to do their bit, but we also have to take on some responsibilities. After KK’s death, my parents became very worried and they insisted I take up a full-body check-up every three to four months. Performing live is not an easy job. You perform energetically for 90-odd minutes. You are often contract bound to perform for a stipulated time. You choreograph, sing with high energy and you need to be fit. It is my duty also take care of my body.

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