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Paradise Review – Prasanna Vithanage follows a couple entangled in conflicts to examine Sri Lanka's socioeconomic landscape

Paradise Review – With a deft script and strong performances, Prasanna Vithanage adeptly conveys the humanitarian issues of Sri Lanka, certain to confront one's thoughts about the value of human life.

4/5rating
Paradise Review – Prasanna Vithanage follows a couple entangled in conflicts to examine Sri Lanka's socioeconomic landscape
Roshan Mathew and Darshana Rajendran in Paradise

Last Updated: 01.28 PM, Jun 28, 2024

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Paradise Story - A young couple from India travel to the crisis-ridden Sri Lanka to celebrate their fifth wedding anniversary. However, when they are robbed inadvertently, the disagreements become more intense and expose fissures in their bond as well as gradually causing the socioeconomic state of the nation to cause discord amongst individuals.

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Paradise Review – Prasanna Vithanage masterfully examines the political and financial circumstances of a nation and its citizens as they struggle to survive in a time of crisis. The director skillfully employs a well-written screenplay to explore these issues through the eyes of a young couple on a vacation in the country at the time. Although the area appears to be Paradise to outsiders, the residents may not agree, as this movie accurately depicts.

Kesav, a young filmmaker, and Amritha, an aspiring novelist, travel to Sri Lanka to celebrate their fifth wedding anniversary. They do, however, arrive at the location during a period of national bankruptcy and widespread protests over the scarcity of fuel and other necessities. The couple is unaware of the intense atmosphere that surrounds them, but everything changes when they endure a robbery that night the same day they arrive.

Amritha appears composed and never stops admiring the landscape's beauty, in contrast to Kesav, who is agitated and furious about his phone and laptop being stolen. Their relationship also begins to deteriorate as a result of each of them questioning the other's feelings and viewpoint on life. They experience their worst nightmare when an accused person in the robbery case unexpectedly passes away, causing violent chaos.

The best thing about Paradise is its clear and concise script, which effectively conveys each character's inner and outer conflicts without making room for a lot of conversations. It depicts a nation that deserves to be treated well and its people, who are waiting for a saviour to rescue them from the daily crisis they find themselves in, in a beautiful yet distressing way.

The allusion to the Ramayana and its various interpretations serves as a masterful instrument for delving into the multitude of philosophical facets that the filmmakers have covered in this film. Amritha, for example, is seen questioning their tour guide Mathew about whether he believes that women cry and wait for men to save them, casting doubt on the latter's understanding of how contemporary women handle crises.

The debate over the worth of human life in the midst of power struggles between higher authorities serves as a reminder that many places' sociopolitical scenes have remained relatively unchanged over time. The topics discussed in Paradise are relevant not only to Sri Lanka but also to any nation that is experiencing a decline in its social and economic standing. In this movie, a police officer is shown saying that a man's life is most valuable when elections are taking place. This does not specifically highlight the situation in Sri Lanka, but rather in most democratic nations.

The performances in this film are also impressive. At their best, Roshan Mathew and Darshana Rajendran skillfully navigate through the complex emotions of Kesav and Amritha, respectively, leaving no detail unturned in order to portray their conflicts with not much words. Darshana is a delight to watch as Amritha, who finds joy in small things amidst the chaos around her and her dilemma with her partner’s outlook on the value of human life. She is empathetic and watching her figure out the crisis around her is intriguing. Roshan has also done an impeccable job of portraying a man's vulnerability during a full-blown crisis.

The varied perspective of the people in Sri Lanka is brought to life by actors Shyam Fernando, Mahendra Perera, Sumith Ilango, and Azher Samsoodeen, who have all done their parts convincingly. Rajeev Ravi's cinematography never fails to highlight the splendour of Sri Lanka's verdant landscapes.

Paradise Verdict - With a deft script and strong performances, Prasanna Vithanage adeptly conveys the humanitarian issues of his hometown, certain to confront one's thoughts about the value of human life.

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