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Saturday Night movie review: Nivin Pauly's movie tries hard to be fun but works sparingly

It's also one of those movies where you feel the characters are shallow and the story flabby.

2.5/5rating
Saturday Night movie review: Nivin Pauly's movie tries hard to be fun but works sparingly
Nivin Pauly in a poster of Saturday Night
  • Sanjith Sidhardhan

Last Updated: 04.04 PM, Nov 04, 2022

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Story:

Stanley forms the core that binds his circle of friends who include 'Poocha' Sunil, Justin and Ajith. Issues begin to crop up between latter two over a girl that soon escalates to a point that Stanley and Sunil are trying to run around solving their problems. Despite warnings from those whom Justin and Ajith have failed, Stanley sticks by them. But an incident happens that has far-reaching repercussions, especially for Stanley. Years later, when the group comes together, they just find out what happened and also accomplish a long-cherished plan of Stanley. 

Review:

It's always a joy to watch movies revolving around friends. Such films come with a set of characters that you could at least relate to one of them. More importantly, it also evokes nostalgia. In Rosshan Andrrews' Saturday Night, the filmmaker tries to accomplish both those aims - with a story about childhood friends who grow estranged while becoming adults. The makers try hard, really hard to make it work, and to their credit it does when it lets go of its dramatic dialogues and becomes goofy. But to get there, it would test the audience's patience. 

The movie revolves around a group of friends, who are brought together after a gap of eight years as a solution to the current crisis they are facing in their adult lives. But unknown to them, the protagonist Stanley, who is the core of the group, has had to face another challenge - one that makes him stuck in the past, which is also the most happiest phase of his life.

While it's fun to imagine a group of men in their 30s trying to rekindle some fun and energy into the monotonous lives filled with expectations and responsibilities, the film's script doesn't reveal anything new than what the audience has already seen. The writing is flat and sometimes overtly dramatic. Even Nivin's Bob Marley-esque dialogues wear out the humour after the actor has to repeatedly say it, just to inject some energy into the proceedings. 

It's also one of those movies where you feel the characters are shallow and the story flabby. This weighs down the proceedings, especially in the first half where the incidents lack any soul whatsoever. The backstories of each character doesn't evoke any emotions. The sequence, apparently inspired by Say Anything…, with Siju Wilson also appears cliched. 

Nivin Pauly, Saiju Kurup and Siju Wilson in a still from Saturday Night
Nivin Pauly, Saiju Kurup and Siju Wilson in a still from Saturday Night

To totally pull off a zany movie like this, the actors had to go all out and here there are times where you'd feel that even the actors are only partially convinced. But then again, it's the goofy bits in the second half when the other characters let their guard down, it becomes fun. 

Also read: Kooman movie review: Asif Ali's thriller is a fine addition to Jeethu Joseph's 'criminal vs cop' universe

The positives though could be the intention of the makers - to show how for Stanley, who is perceived as the core of the movie, his friends are his world. The scene where the friends break the ice and shake a leg with Ashvin Mathew's magistrate character is one of the highlights that is sure to bring a smile to your face. The art department also does a decent job in the film that has high production values. 

The film doesn't try to be a Zindagi Milegi Dobaara, The Hangover or even In Harihar Nagar; it's original that way but that doesn't do any favours when the writing lacks imagination. 

Verdict:

This Rosshan Andrrews' film is rather forgettable.

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